Field Trips

Middle School

Sixth Grade Through Eighth Grade

Teatown’s trails are filled with clues about the stories of the animals and plants, rocks and slopes that make up our preserve. In a hike around Teatown Lake, students will find visual landmarks and use observations to answer questions about their surroundings. They will learn how to spot the signs of wildlife and land transformation that exist all over our property. This program provides a review of topics in geology, biology and ecology while sharpening students’ powers of observation, awareness of their environment, and their critical thinking about the ecosystem they live in.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for phenomena. (MS-LS2-1)
Construct a scientific explanation based on valid and reliable evidence obtained from sources (including the students’ own experiments) and the assumption that theories and laws that describe the natural world operate today as they did in the past and will continue to do so in the future. (MS-LS1-6)

Cross-cutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. (MS-LS2-1)
Patterns can be used to identify cause and effect relationships. (MS-LS2-2)
Stability might be disturbed either by sudden events or gradual changes that accumulate over time. (MS-ESS3-5)

Teatown provides enhanced learning to complement Trout in the Classroom. Visit a local trout stream where Teatown educators review with your students the physical, chemical and biological components that provide the ideal habitat parameters for release of trout fry. View macroinvertebrates that provide food for larger organisms. Observe your surroundings and take basic measurements like temperature and dissolved oxygen level. Then release your fish.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for phenomena. (MS-LS2-1)

Disciplinary Core Ideas
Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. (MS-LS2-1)
Biodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth’s ecosystems. The completeness or integrity of an ecosystem’s biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health. (MS-LS2-5)

Crosscutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. (MS-LS2-1)
Stability might be disturbed either by sudden events or gradual changes that accumulate over time. (MS-ESS3-5)
The transfer of energy can be tracked as energy flows through a natural system. (MS-LS2-3)

Explore the physical, biological and chemical characteristics of Bailey Brook to understand the stream as a freshwater ecosystem. Meet the macroinvertebrates living in the stream, take temperature and dissolved oxygen levels, observe how trees shade and filter the water. Make the connections to our larger ecosystem, recognizing the importance of healthy streams to all of us in the Hudson Valley watershed.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for phenomena. (MS-LS2-1)

Disciplinary Core Ideas
Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. (MS-LS2-1)
Biodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth’s ecosystems. The completeness or integrity of an ecosystem’s biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health. (MS-LS2-5)

Crosscutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. (MS-LS2-1)
Stability might be disturbed either by sudden events or gradual changes that accumulate over time. (MS-ESS3-5)
The transfer of energy can be tracked as energy flows through a natural system. (MS-LS2-3)

What’s living in your backyard? Live animals, mounts and bones will be used in this lively program about the species found in the lower Hudson Valley. Concepts such as biodiversity, population dynamics, habitat fragmentation, adaptation and conservation are introduced. Through encounters with our animal ambassadors, students will find out why some animals struggle to survive in our suburban environment, while others thrive and multiply. They will leave with an appreciation of the diverse life that surrounds us, and some ways to live in better harmony with wildlife.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for phenomena. (MS-LS2-1)
Construct a scientific explanation based on valid and reliable evidence obtained from sources (including the students’ own experiments) and the assumption that theories and laws that describe the natural world operate today as they did in the past and will continue to do so in the future. (MS-LS1-6

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. (MS-LS2-1)
Biodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth’s ecosystems. The completeness or integrity of an ecosystem’s biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health. (MS-LS2-5)
Changes in biodiversity can influence humans’ resources, such as food, energy, and medicines, as well as ecosystem services that humans rely on—for example, water purification and recycling. (secondary to MS-LS2-5)
Humans impact biodiversity both positively and negatively. (secondary to MS-LS2-5)
Adaptation by natural selection acting over generations is one important process by which species change over time in response to changes in environmental conditions. Traits that support successful survival and reproduction in the new environment become more common; those that do not become less common. Thus, the distribution of traits in a population changes. (MS-LS4-6)

Crosscutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. (MS-LS2-1)
Stability might be disturbed either by sudden events or gradual changes that accumulate over time. (MS-ESS3-5)

Take flight and soar, as we take a close look at the amazing adaptations that make raptors successful hunters. The specialized use of talons and beaks, wing design and acute eyesight and hearing, in addition to the principles of flight will be demonstrated. Teatown’s non-releasable hawks and owls make an appearance for students to view raptors’ specialized adaptations.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for phenomena. (MS-LS2-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
In multicellular organisms, the body is a system of multiple interacting subsystems. These subsystems are groups of cells that work together to form tissues and organs that are specialized for particular body functions. (MS-LS1-3)
Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. (MS-LS2-1)
In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. (MS-LS2-1)
Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources. (MS-LS2-1)
Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in all its populations. (MS-LS2-4)
Animals engage in characteristic behaviors that increase the odds of reproduction. (MS-LS1-4)

Crosscutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. (MS-LS2-1)
Patterns can be used to identify cause and effect relationships. (MS-LS2-2)

The sap that rises in the maple tree in late winter has been a local food source since indigenous people lived in these woods. It also invites us to think about phenology, the study of seasonal change. In this program, students are introduced to the science of phenology and its relationship to a changing climate. By interacting with maps and charts, they learn the sugar maple’s yearly cycle and compare its range with the range of other trees in New York’s forests. Using this data to make inferences, they predict how global warming may affect the sugar maple and the maple sugar industry in New York. Students finish with a tour and a sample of the Teatown sugaring process.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for phenomena. (MS-LS2-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
In multicellular organisms, the body is a system of multiple interacting subsystems. These subsystems are groups of cells that work together to form tissues and organs that are specialized for particular body functions. (MS-LS1-3)
Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. (MS-LS2-1)
Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in all its populations. (MS-LS2-4)
Changes in biodiversity can influence humans’ resources, such as food, energy, and medicines, as well as ecosystem services that humans rely on—for example, water purification and recycling. (secondary to MS-LS2-5)
(NYSED) Humans impact biodiversity both positively and negatively. (secondary to MS-LS2-5)
Human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, are major factors in the current rise in Earth’s mean surface temperature (global warming). Reducing the level of climate change and reducing human vulnerability to whatever climate changes do occur depend on the understanding of climate science, engineering capabilities, and other kinds of knowledge, such as understanding of human behavior and on applying that knowledge wisely in decisions and activities. (MS-ESS3-5)

Crosscutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. (MS-LS2-1) Patterns can be used to identify cause and effect relationships. (MS-LS2-2)

Studying the Hudson River is an amazing way to learn geology and biology at the same time. This new program, taught at the Riverwalk Center in Sleepy Hollow, takes us down to the beach of our local estuary – the Hudson. Students learn about the glacial activity that carved out the river valley, the slow work of weathering that created river rocks, and the daily tidal changes that bring fresh water down from the north and salt water up from the south. By interacting with maps and charts, sorting rocks, observing animals we have caught in the river, and plunging their hands into our Augmented Reality sandbox, students experience the Hudson as landform and as ecosystem.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for phenomena. (MS-LS2-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. (MS-LS2-1)
(NYSED) Biodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth’s ecosystems. The completeness or integrity of an ecosystem’s biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health. (MS-LS2-5)
In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. (MS-LS2-1)
Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources. (MS-LS2-1)
Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in all its populations. (MS-LS2-4)

Water’s movements—both on the land and underground—cause weathering and erosion, which change the land’s surface features and create underground formations. (MS-ESS2-2)
Global movements of water and its changes in form are driven by sunlight and gravity. (MS-ESS2-4)
Humans depend on Earth’s land, ocean, atmosphere, and biosphere for many different resources. Minerals, fresh water, and biosphere resources are limited, and many are not renewable or replaceable over human lifetimes. These resources are distributed unevenly around the planet as a result of past geologic processes. (MS-ESS3-1)

Crosscutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. (MS-LS2-1)
Stability might be disturbed either by sudden events or gradual changes that accumulate over time. (MS-ESS3-5)

Learn how to navigate the old-fashioned way. Working with a team, use the tools of map, compass and collaboration to solve problems and find landmarks in the woods. First team back is the winner!

Who is awake when you are asleep? Using pictorial data from Teatown’s trail cameras, analyze and compare the daily habits of opossums, squirrels and deer. Learn the distinction between nocturnal, diurnal and crepuscular animals, and discuss the relationship between their behaviors and their role in the ecosystem. Finish by hiking out onto Teatown’s preserve and setting your own motion-detecting camera. Several weeks later, your class will receive its original data in the form of pictures from the camera you set in the woods.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for phenomena. (MS-LS2-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Biodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth’s ecosystems. The completeness or integrity of an ecosystem’s biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health. (MS-LS2-5)
Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. (MS-LS2-1)
In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. (MS-LS2-1)
Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources. (MS-LS2-1)

Crosscutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. (MS-LS2-1)

Connections to Nature of Science
Science assumes that objects and events in natural systems occur in consistent patterns that are understandable through measurement and observation. (MS-LS2-3)