Field Trips

1st Grade – 5th Grade

First Grade

Nature’s engineers, beaver have made a comeback in the Northeast. In this STEM program students will observe how the beaver’s return has made an impact on the Teatown landscape, view a beaver lodge and learn about beaver family structure, understand how beavers change their environment to meet their needs, and engineer and test their own beaver dams.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to construct an evidence-based account for natural phenomena. (1-LS3-1)    Use materials to design a device that solves a specific problem or a solution to a specific problem. (1-LS1-1)

Disciplinary Core Ideas
Adult plants and animals can have young. In many kinds of animals, parents and the offspring themselves engage in behaviors that help the offspring to survive. (1-LS1-2) Animals have body parts that capture and convey different kinds of information needed for growth and survival. Animals respond to these inputs with behaviors that help them survive. (1-LS1-1)

Crosscutting Concepts
Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence. (1-LS1-2), (1-LS3-1)  The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s). (1-LS1-1)

Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science
Every human-made product is designed by applying some knowledge of the natural world and is built by using materials derived from the natural world (1-LS1-1)

Reptiles, birds and mammals, oh my! We share the world with a variety of unique fascinating creatures. In this dynamic program, the fundamentals of vertebrate classification are taught using mounts and live animals from Teatown’s collection. External parts are compared, and students learn how different kinds of skin covering, eyes, mouths and feet can function to help animals survive. Students are given the opportunity to touch the animals and develop respect for animal life.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to construct an evidence-based account for natural phenomena. (1-LS3-1)

Disciplinary Core Ideas
All organisms have external parts. Different animals use their body parts in different ways to see, hear, grasp objects, protect themselves, move from place to place, and seek, find, and take in food, water and air. (1-LS1-1) Animals have body parts that capture and convey different kinds of information needed for growth and survival. Animals respond to these inputs with behaviors that help them survive. (1-LS1-1)

Crosscutting Concepts
Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence. (1-LS1-2), (1-LS3-1) The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s). (1-LS1-1)

Do you know what lives in the Hudson River? Get ready to find out! Through models, demonstrations and participatory activities including exploration of a Hudson River beach, students will learn that our great river is teeming with life. They will investigate how different animals meet their needs, why water is important to humans, and how people can help keep the river clean. Science focus is on how animals use their body parts to help them survive.

Standards

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to construct an evidence-based account for natural phenomena. (1-LS3-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
All organisms have external parts. Different animals use their body parts in different ways to see, hear, grasp objects, protect themselves, move from place to place, and seek, find, and take in food, water and air. (1-LS1-1) Animals have body parts that capture and convey different kinds of information needed for growth and survival. Animals respond to these inputs with behaviors that help them survive (1-LS1-1)

Cross-cutting Concepts
Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence. (1-LS1-2), (1-LS3-1) The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s). (1-LS1-1)

This innovative program takes students to a site along the Hudson River to view a once endangered species which has made a comeback in the Lower Hudson Valley – the bald eagle. Using games, artifacts and spotting scopes, students explore the eagle’s anatomy and life cycle, discover the reasons behind its amazing conservation story and learn how our actions will ensure that eagles remain a healthy species. Science focus includes the function of the eagle’s external parts, and behavior patterns that help the eagles raise their young.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to construct an evidence-based account for natural phenomena. (1-LS3-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Adult plants and animals can have young. In many kinds of animals, parents and the offspring themselves engage in behaviors that help the offspring to survive. (1-LS1-2) Some young animals are similar to, but not exactly, like their parents. (1-LS3-1)

Cross-cutting Concepts
Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence. (1-LS1-2), (1-LS3-1) The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s). (1-LS1-1)

Second Grade

The most magical time of the year at Teatown is sugaring time! Students will be introduced to the technology of sugaring, which has been a sustainable industry in New York State since colonial times. They will learn how trees produce sap and why, and how to identify a sugar maple. In our sugar house they will observe the process of concentrating sap into syrup, and the physical changes that take place as water evaporates and sugar remains behind. This program blends history, botany, physics and chemistry for a truly interdisciplinary program with the added bonus of a sensory treat.

Standards

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to construct an evidence-based account for natural phenomena. (1-LS3-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Different kinds of matter exist and many of them can be either solid or liquid, depending on temperature. Matter can be described and classified by its observable properties. (2-PS1-1) Heating or cooling a substance may cause changes that can be observed. Sometimes these changes are reversible, and sometimes they are not. (2-PS1-4)

Crosscutting Concepts
Events have causes that generate observable patterns. (2-PS1-4)

Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science
Every human-made product is designed by applying some knowledge of the natural world and is built using materials derived from the natural world (2-PS1-2)

We all know that many animals depend on plants for food. But how do plants depend on animals? Meet the pollinators! The popular view of insects as troublemakers is broadening to an understanding of the vital role they play in nature and agriculture. In the meadows and gardens of our Cliffdale Farm, students will observe first-hand the activities of pollinators, collect data, play interactive games, and think about interdependence in ecosystems.

Standards

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to collect data that can be used to make comparisons. (2-LS4-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Animals depend on plants or other animals for food. (2-LS2-2) Some plants depend on animals for pollination and for dispersal of seeds from one location to another. (2-LS2-2) Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas to other people. (secondary to 2-LS2-2)

Cross-cutting Concepts
Events have causes that generate observable patterns. (2-PS1-4) The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s). (2-LS2-2) Similarities and differences in patterns can be used to sort and classify organisms. (2-LS4-1)

Come to Teatown’s Cliffdale Farm and observe four different habitats – forest, meadow, wetland and lawn.  Collect data on the plant communities that live there, and make comparisons about what lives where and why.  Learn the concept of “biodiversity” and why it is important for plants, animals and us.  Home is where the habitat is!

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to collect data that can be used to make comparisons. (2-LS4-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Animals depend on plants or other animals for food. (2-LS2-2) Plants depend on water, light and air to grow. (2-LS2-2) Some plants depend on animals for pollination and for dispersal of seeds from one location to another. (2-LS2-2) Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas to other people (secondary to 2-LS2-2)

Crosscutting Concepts
Events have causes that generate observable patterns. (2-PS1-4) The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s). (2-LS2-2) Similarities and differences in patterns can be used to sort and classify. (2-LS4-1)

A tree operates like a factory, records history like a book, and plays an essential role in the ecosystem at each stage of its life. Through games and activities, students will learn about trees’ structure, how they get what they need to survive, and the food and habitat they provide for animals in a forest community. On a guided hike, students will use observation and comparison skills to identify trees.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to collect data that can be used to make comparisons. (2-LS4-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Animals depend on plants or other animals for food. (2-LS2-2) Plants depend on water, light and air to grow. (2-LS2-1) There are many different kinds of living things in any area, and they exist in different places on land and in water. (2-LS4-1)

Cross-cutting Concepts
Events have causes that generate observable patterns. (2-PS1-4) The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s). (2-LS2-2)

Teatown Lake is an amazing place to discover the complexities of a freshwater ecosystem. For a hands-on experience, students use dip nets to search for the diversity of life in the lake. Using a video-adapted microscope, students will get a close up view to see the special structures of small aquatic creatures, and be able to compare form and function. Food webs and predator-prey interactions are explored.

Standards

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to collect data that can be used to make comparisons. (2-LS4-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Animals depend on plants or other animals for food. (2-LS2-2) There are many different kinds of living things in any area, and they exist in different places on land and in water. (2-LS4-1)

Cross-cutting Concepts
Events have causes that generate observable patterns. (2-PS1-4) The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s). (2-LS2-2) Similarities and differences in patterns can be used to sort and classify organisms. (2-LS4-1)

Studying the Hudson River is an amazing way to learn geology and biology at the same time.  This program, taught at the Riverwalk Center in Sleepy Hollow, takes us down to the beach of our local estuary – the Hudson.  Students learn about the slow changes that carved out the river valley, and the daily tidal changes that bring fresh water down from the north and salt water up from the south.  By interacting with maps and charts, sorting rocks, observing animals we have caught in the river, and plunging their hands into our Augmented Reality sandbox, students experience the Hudson as landform and as ecosystem.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to collect data that can be used to make comparisons. (2-LS4-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Some events happen very quickly; others occur very slowly, over a time period much longer than one can observe. (2-ESS1-1) Wind and water can change the shape of the land. (2-ESS2-1) Maps show where things are located. One can map the shapes and kinds of land and water in any area. (2-ESS2-2)

Crosscutting Concepts
Events have causes that generate observable patterns. (2-PS1-4) Similarities and differences in patterns can be used to sort and classify. (2-LS4-1)

Third Grade

Meet the pollinators!  The popular view of insects as troublemakers is broadening to an understanding of the vital role they play in nature and agriculture.  In this buzzy program, students will study the importance of insects that pollinate, and current threats to the habitats that support their wellbeing.  In the meadows and gardens of our Cliffdale Farm, students will observe first-hand the activities of pollinators, collect data, and play interactive games.  They will conclude by discussing how to preserve and create healthy environments for pollinators.

Standards

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to make sense of phenomena using logical reasoning. (3-LS4-1)
Construct an argument with evidence, data, and/or a model. (3-LS2-1)
Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem by citing relevant evidence about how it meets the criteria and constraints of the problem. (3-LS4-4)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
When the environment changes in ways that affect a place’s physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of resources, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die. (secondary to 3-LS4-4)
Being part of a group helps some animals obtain food, defend themselves, and survive. Groups may serve different functions and vary dramatically in size. (Note: Moved from K–2) (3-LS2-1)

Cross-cutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified and used to explain change. (3-LS2-1), (3-LS4-3)
A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (3-LS4-4)

Come to Teatown’s Cliffdale Farm and observe four different habitats – forest, meadow, wetland and lawn.  Collect data on the plant communities that live there, and make comparisons about what lives where and why.  Learn the concept of  “biodiversity” and how it is important for plants, animals and us.  Conclude by evaluating ways to preserve diverse and healthy environments.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to make sense of phenomena using logical reasoning. (3-LS4-1)
Construct an argument with evidence, data, and/or a model. (3-LS2-1)
Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem by citing relevant evidence about how it meets the criteria and constraints of the problem. (3-LS4-4)

Core Disciplinary Ideas (LS4.C: Adaptation)
For any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. (3-LS4-3)
Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there. (3-LS4-4)

Crosscutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified and used to explain change. (3-LS2-1), (3-LS4-3)
A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (3-LS4-4)

The 3 M’s of spring – mating, metamorphosis and migration – are covered in this lively interactive program. Using natural materials, games and live animals, students are introduced to stages of development, life cycles and patterns of change that occur in spring.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Use evidence (e.g., observations, patterns) to support an explanation. (3-LS3-2)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Reproduction is essential to the continued existence of every kind of organism. Plants and animals have unique and diverse life cycles. (3-LS1-1)

Crosscutting Concepts
Similarities and differences in patterns can be used to sort and classify natural phenomena. (3-LS3-1)
Patterns of change can be used to make predictions. (3-LS1-1)
Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified and used to explain change. (3-LS3-2),(3-LS4-2)
 

Students explore a vernal pool habitat and meet some of the amphibians who depend on these pools for breeding, metamorphosis, food and protection. The importance of stewardship is illustrated through an energetic game that illustrates the roadblocks amphibians encounter as they migrate to their spring breeding grounds. Students discuss ways we can protect these endangered habitats. An outreach visit to your school can be linked with this program to provide an introductory classroom lesson on metamorphosis. Meets at Cliffdale Farm

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to make sense of phenomena using logical reasoning. (3-LS4-1)
Construct an argument with evidence. (3-LS4-3)
Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem by citing relevant evidence about how it meets the criteria and constraints of the problem. (3-LS4-4)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
When the environment changes in ways that affect a place’s physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of resources, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die (3-LS4-3)
Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there. (3-LS4-4)
Reproduction is essential to the continued existence of every kind of organism. Plants and animals have unique and diverse life cycles. (3-LS1-1)

Cross-cutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified and used to explain change. (3-LS2-1), (3-LS4-3)
A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (3-LS4-4)

Everybody lives in a watershed! Ours includes the forests and streams that drain to the Hudson River. Through outdoor and indoor activities, students will explore the relationship between trees and bodies of water. They will learn how forests filter water, and observe for themselves trees helping keep our local water supply clean. They will meet organisms that live in healthy streams and lakes, learn about pollution issues and explore ways to keep our watershed healthy.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations and/or measurements to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence for an explanation of a phenomenon. (3-ESS2-3)
Construct an argument with evidence, data, and/or a model. (3-LS2-1)
Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem by citing relevant evidence about how it meets the criteria and constraints of the problem. (3-ESS3-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Earth’s processes continuously cycle water, contributing to weather and climate. (3-ESS2-3)
For any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. (3-LS4-3)
Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there. (3-LS4-4)

Cross-cutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified, tested, and used to explain change. (3-ESS2-3), (3-ESS3-1)
A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (3-LS4-4)

That water you send down the sink , the toilet or the driveway – where does it go? What do you know about the water in our streams and rivers – how clean is it? Investigate these questions in a Teatown program held at the Riverwalk Center in Sleepy Hollow. Through games and participatory activities, students will learn about sources of pollution in the Hudson and its tributaries, and discuss ways to address the problems we have caused.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations and/or measurements to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence for an explanation of a phenomenon. (3-ESS2-3)
Construct an argument with evidence, data, and/or a model. (3-LS2-1)
Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem by citing relevant evidence about how it meets the criteria and constraints of the problem. (3-ESS3-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
A variety of natural hazards result from natural processes. Humans cannot eliminate natural hazards but can take steps to reduce their impacts. (3-ESS3-1)
Wind and water can change the shape of the land. (2-ESS2-1)

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there. (3-LS4-4)

Crosscutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified, tested, and used to explain change. (3-ESS2-3), (3-ESS3-1)
A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (3-LS4-4)
Engineers improve existing technologies or develop new ones to increase their benefits (3-ESS3-1)
Science affects everyday life. (3-ESS3-1)

What’s living in your backyard? Live animals, mounts and bones will be used in this lively program about the species found in the lower Hudson Valley. As they meet our animal ambassadors, students will learn about biodiversity, habitat specialists, habitat generalists and habitat loss. They will find out why some animals struggle to survive in our suburban environment, while others thrive and multiply. They will leave with an appreciation of the diverse life that surrounds us, and some ways to live in better harmony with wildlife.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations and/or measurements to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence for an explanation of a phenomenon. (3-ESS2-3)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
For any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. (3-LS4-3)
Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there. (3-LS4-4)
Different organisms vary in how they look and function because they have different inherited information. (3-LS3-1)

Crosscutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified, tested, and used to explain change. (3-ESS2-3), (3-ESS3-1)
A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (3-LS3-2), (3-LS4-2)

Fourth Grade

The most magical time of the year at Teatown is sugaring time! Students will be introduced to the technology of sugaring, which has been a sustainable industry in New York State since colonial times. They will learn how trees produce sap and why, and how to identify a sugar maple. In our sugar house they will observe the process of concentrating sap into syrup, and the physical changes that take place as water evaporates and sugar remains behind. This program blends history, botany, physics and chemistry for a truly interdisciplinary program with the added bonus of a sensory treat.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to construct an evidence-based account for natural phenomena. (2-PS1-3)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Plants and animals have both internal and external structures that serve various functions in growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction. (4-LS1-1)
Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria). . . (secondary to 4-PS3-4)
Energy can be transferred by moving objects or by sound, light, heat, or electric currents. (4-PS3-2), (4-PS3-3)

Cross-cutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified. (4-PS4-2)

Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science 
Knowledge of relevant scientific concepts and research findings is important in engineering (4-ESS3-1)

Influence of Engineering, Technology, and Science on Society and the Natural World
Engineers improve existing technologies or develop new ones. (4-PS3-4)

Connections to the Nature of Science
Science affects everyday life. (4-PS3-4)

Students will travel back in time to discover the forces that shaped the face of the Hudson Valley. Through observing and comparing rocks from our collection, they will learn the difference between rocks and minerals, and how sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks are formed. During outdoor exploration, we will look for evidence of the fast and slow forces that have changed and continue to change Teatown’s landscape. The program will conclude with a simulation showing how a mile-high glacier slowly carved out the Hudson Valley during the Ice Age.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Analyze and interpret data to make sense of phenomena using logical reasoning. (4-ESS2-2)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
ESS1.C: The History of the Planet Earth
Local, regional, and global patterns of rock formations reveal changes over time due to earth forces, such as earthquakes. (4-ESS1-1)

ESS2.A: Earth Materials and Systems
Rainfall helps to shape the land and affects the types of living things found in a region. Water, ice, wind, living organisms, and gravity break rocks, soils, and sediments into smaller particles and move them around. (4-ESS2-1)

Crosscutting Concepts
Patterns can be used as evidence to support an explanation.  (4-ESS1-1), (4­-ESS2-2) 
Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified, tested, and used to explain change. (4-ESS2-1), (4-ESS3-2)

Connections to the Nature of Science
Science assumes consistent patterns in natural systems. (4-ESS1-1)

Studying the Hudson River is an amazing way to learn geology and biology at the same time. Taught at the Riverwalk Center in Sleepy Hollow, this program takes us down to the beach of our local estuary – the Hudson. Students learn about the glacial activity that carved out the river valley, the slow work of weathering that created river rocks, and the daily tidal changes that bring fresh water down from the north and salt water up from the south. By interacting with maps and charts, sorting rocks, observing animals we have caught in the river, and plunging their hands into our Augmented Reality sandbox, students experience the Hudson as landform and as ecosystem.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Make observations (firsthand or from media) to collect data that can be used to make comparisons. (2-LS4-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Plants and animals have both internal and external structures that serve various functions in growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction. (4-LS1-1)
Local, regional, and global patterns of rock formations reveal changes over time due to earth forces, such as earthquakes. (4-ESS1-1)
Rainfall helps to shape the land and affects the types of living things found in a region. Water, ice, wind, living organisms, and gravity break rocks, soils, and sediments into smaller particles and move them around. (4-ESS2-1)

Crosscutting Concepts
Events have causes that generate observable patterns. (2-PS1-4)
Similarities and differences in patterns can be used to sort and classify. (4-PS4-3)

Take flight and soar, as we take a close look at the amazing adaptations that make raptors successful hunters. The specialized use of talons and beaks, wing design and acute eyesight and hearing, in addition to the principles of flight will be demonstrated with the help of some of Teatown’s animal ambassadors. Through the use of costumes and role-playing, students will learn about a bird’s unique anatomy and a raptor’s specialized structure, behaviors and information processing.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Develop a model to describe phenomena. (4-PS4-2)
Construct an argument with evidence, data, and/or a model. (4-LS1-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Plants and animals have both internal and external structures that serve various functions in growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction. (4-LS1-1)
Different sense receptors are specialized for particular kinds of information, which may be then processed by the animal’s brain. Animals are able to use their perceptions and memories to guide their actions. (4-LS1-2)

Cross-cutting Concepts 
Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified. (4-PS4-2)

Systems and Systems Models
A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (4-LS1-1), (4-LS1-2)

Children are fascinated by their fellow-animals and the ways we are similar and different. In this dynamic program, animal classification is presented using skeletons, mounts and live animals from Teatown’s collection. Students handle bones, feathers, and skins and use them to compare the anatomy of different groups of vertebrates. They learn how different animals receive and process sensory information. They are also given the opportunity to respectfully touch live animals in order to enhance their own sensory experience.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Construct an argument with evidence, data, and/or a model. (4-LS1-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Plants and animals have both internal and external structures that serve various functions in growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction. (4-LS1-1)
Different sense receptors are specialized for particular kinds of information, which may be then processed by the animal’s brain. Animals are able to use their perceptions and memories to guide their actions. (4-LS1-2)

Cross-cutting Concepts
Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified. (4-PS4-2)
A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (4-LS1-1), (LS1-2)

Take a fascinating look at the history of the Eastern Woodland people at the period of contact with Europe. Using our recreated Lenape village including a wigwam, longhouse and replicated artifacts, children learn how Native Americans relied on the land to meet all their needs. Grinding corn, cooking food, making clothing and playing games are some of the activities explored. Students learn how the native people formed connections to animals and plants through their beliefs, knowledge and traditions. Meets at Cliffdale Farm.

New York Social Studies Standards:

Chronological Reasoning and Causation 7  
Recognize and identify patterns of continuity and change in New York State.

Comparison and Contexulation 1
Identify a region in New York State by describing a characteristic that places within it have in common, and then compare it to other regions.

Geographic Reasoning 2
Distinguish human activities and human-made features from “environments” (natural events or physical features—land, air, and water — that are not directly made by humans).

Geographic Reasoning 3
Identify how environments affect human activities and how human activities affect physical environments

This program is an enhanced version of “Keepers of the Earth” that includes a craft-making session after lunch.

Take a fascinating look at the history of the Eastern Woodland people at the period of contact with Europe. Using our recreated Lenape village including a wigwam, longhouse and replicated artifacts, children learn how Native Americans relied on the land to meet all their needs. Grinding corn, cooking food, making clothing and playing games are some of the activities explored. Students learn how the native people formed connections to animals and plants through their beliefs, knowledge and traditions.

After lunch, to learn more about how native people used resources from the environment, students are shown how to work with materials like bark, stems and vines, and each person makes a simple artifact to take home.

Meets at Cliffdale Farm.

New York Social Studies Standards:

Chronological Reasoning and Causation 7
Recognize and identify patterns of continuity and change in New York State.

Comparison and Contextualization 1
Identify a region in New York State by describing a characteristic that places within it have in common, and then compare it to other regions.

Geographic Reasoning 2
Distinguish human activities and human-made features from “environments” (natural events or physical features—land, air, and water — that are not directly made by humans).

Geographic Reasoning 3

Identify how environments affect human activities and how human activities affect physical environments.

Fifth Grade

Lake, field and forest are all found on Teatown’s preserve. In this 3-hour program, students are introduced to a pictorial model of the lake ecosystem and then go out into the field to record observations in the field and the forest. They use field tools to take soil samples and record soil and air temperatures. They identify plants and look for animals. In a classroom session at the end of the program, they construct a food web of one of the ecosystems, and leave with the information they need to compare the ecosystems with one another.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Use models to describe phenomena. (5-PS3-1)
Develop a model to describe phenomena. (5-LS2-1)
Support an argument with evidence, data, or a model. (5-LS1-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
The energy released [from] food was once energy from the sun that was captured by plants in the chemical process that forms plant matter (from air and water). (5-PS3-1)
The food of almost any kind of animal can be traced back to plants. Organisms are related in food webs in which some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants. Some organisms, such as fungi and bacteria, break down dead organisms (both plants or plants parts and animals) and therefore operate as “decomposers.” Decomposition eventually restores (recycles) some materials back to the soil. Organisms can survive only in environments in which their particular needs are met. A healthy ecosystem is one in which multiple species of different types are each able to meet their needs in a relatively stable web of life. Newly introduced species can damage the balance of an ecosystem. (5-LS2-1)

Cross-cutting Concepts
A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (5-LS2-1)
Matter is transported into, out of, and within systems. (5-LS1-1)
Energy can be transferred in various ways and between objects. (5-PS3-1)

Water! Without it, there would be no life on earth. In this 3-hour program, students become hydrologists and examine the chemistry, geology, meteorology and biology of Teatown’s lake and stream. With freshwater as their focus, they gather, share and analyze data and draw conclusions about some of the ways that earth’s systems interact to create and maintain our lakes and rivers. The role of humans in protecting our freshwater resources is addressed..

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices
Develop a model using an example to describe a scientific principle. (5-ESS2-1)
Support an argument with evidence, data, or a model. (5-LS1-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Earth’s major systems are the geosphere (solid and molten rock, soil, and sediments), the hydrosphere (water and ice), the atmosphere (air), and the biosphere (living things, including humans). These systems interact in multiple ways to affect Earth’s surface materials and processes. (5-ESS2-1)
Nearly all of Earth’s available water is in the ocean. Most fresh water is in glaciers or underground; only a tiny fraction is in streams, lakes, wetlands, and the atmosphere. (5-ESS2-2)
Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have had major effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, air, and even outer space. But individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth’s resources and environments. (5-ESS3-1)

Crosscutting Concepts
Standard units are used to measure and describe physical quantities such as weight, and volume. (5-ESS2-2)
A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (5-ESS2-1), (5-ESS3-1)

Connections to the Nature of Science
 Science findings are limited to questions that can be answered with empirical evidence. (5-ESS3-1)

That water you send down the sink, the toilet or the driveway – where does it go? What do you know about the water in our streams and rivers – how clean is it? Investigate these questions in a Teatown program held at the Riverwalk Center in Sleepy Hollow. Through games and participatory activities, students will learn about sources of pollution in the Hudson and its tributaries, and discuss ways to address the problems we have caused.

Standards:

Science and Engineering Practices

Obtain and combine information from books and/or other reliable media to explain phenomena or solutions to a design problem. (5-ESS3-1)
Construct an argument with evidence, data, and/or a model. (3-LS2-1)
Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem by citing relevant evidence about how it meets the criteria and constraints of the problem. (3-ESS3-1)

Core Disciplinary Ideas
Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have had major effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, air, and even outer space. But individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth’s resources and environments. (5-ESS3-1)

Crosscutting Concepts
Standard units are used to measure and describe physical quantities such as weight, and volume. (5-ESS2-2)
A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (5-ESS2-1), (5-ESS3-1)

Connections to the Nature of Science
Science findings are limited to questions that can be answered with empirical evidence. (5-ESS3-1)