5th – 8th grade

TROUT IN THE CLASSROOM (2 hours)
Teatown provides enhanced learning to complement Trout in the Classroom. Visit a local trout stream where Teatown educators review with your students the physical, chemical and biological components that provide the ideal habitat parameters for release of trout fry.

HUDSON VALLEY WILDLIFE
Grades 4 – 8 (2 hours)
What’s living in your backyard? Live animals, mounts, furs and bones will be used in this lively program about the species found in the lower Hudson Valley. Concepts such as biodiversity, population dynamics, habitat fragmentation and conservation are discussed.

BIRDS OF PREY
Grades 5 – 8
Take flight and soar, as we take a close look at the amazing adaptations that make raptors successful hunters. The specialized use of talons and beaks, wing design and acute eyesight and hearing, in addition to the principles of flight will be demonstrated. Teatown’s non-releaseable hawks and owls make an appearance for students to view raptors specialized adaptations.

ALL ABOUT WATER (3 hours)
Water! Without it, there would be no life on earth. In this program, students become hydrologists and examine the chemistry, geology, meteorology and biology in 3 different water bodies at Teatown. With freshwater as their focus, they gather, share and analyze data and draw conclusions about some of the ways that earth’s systems interact to create and maintain our lakes and rivers. The role of humans in protecting our freshwater resources is addressed.

EXPLORING ECOSYSTEMS (3 hours)
Lake, field and forest are all found on Teatown’s preserve. Students are introduced to a pictorial model of the lake ecosystem and then venture outdoors employing the scientific method to gather information to determine the interactions between abiotic and biotic factors in two terrestrial ecosystems. Students measure the temperature, soil moisture level, soil pH, and record observations of plant and animal diversity and density. Following their outdoor explorations students build their own pictorial models of the field and forest discussing energy transfer within the ecosystem and leave with the information they need to create a food web of each ecosystem.

MAPLE SUGARING AND CLIMATE CHANGE (2 hours)
The sap that rises in the maple tree in late winter has been a local food source since indigenous people lived in these woods. It also invites us to think about its phenology, the study of seasonal change. In this program, students learn about the science of phenology and its relationship to a changing climate. They view pictures that show the seasonal cycles of trees and shrubs, focus on the sugar maple and how global warming may affect it, analyze data on temperature and sap production and finish with a view of the Teatown sugaring process.